Peterbald Cat Breed

The Peterbald makes a great family pet, as they are very affectionate and fun-loving.
By: PawCulture Editors
Peterbald cat breed

About the Peterbald Cat Breed

A Russian breed with a unique coat, the Peterbald can either be completely hairless or have a coat that looks and feels like a peach. This breed makes a great family pet, as they are very affectionate and fun-loving.

We spoke to The International Cat Association to find out more about the Peterbald.

Peterbald Physical Characteristics

Peterbalds are medium in size with a muscular shape similar to the oriental shorthair.

Color(s)

Many colors and patterns

Coat

Having long been described as having a gene for hairlessness, hair loss or an altered and diminished coat, the Peterbald may be either completely hairless or have a coat that looks and feels to the touch like the skin of a peach. 

Peterbald Personality and Temperament

Activity Level

Moderate

Positives

Highly intelligent and affectionate, Peterbalds are also playful, athletic and friendly. They make great family pets, as many are known to actively pursue spending as much time as possible with their owners.

Things to Consider

Peterbalds have been known to be very vocal.

Peterbald Care

Ideal Living Conditions

The breed is active and athletic, requiring a lot of attention to stay healthy and stimulated. 

Special Requirements

With their distinguished baldness or extremely short hair, Peterbalds require very little to no actual brushing, although they may require extra care during colder weather to keep them warm. They also need regular bathing to remove oil and dirt from their skin, and limited exposure to the sun is recommend to avoid sunburn.

Peterbald Health

Be on the lookout for any skin conditions that may occur, including feline ectodermal dysplasia, or lactation issues.

Peterbald History and Background

The first reported descendant of the Peterbald was believed to have been bred in Russia in 1988. In 1993 a fine, oriental shorthair was bred to a Don Sphynx. The resulting kittens were registered as experimental and one of them, called Nocturne Iz Murino, became the original stud of the Peterbald breed. TICA accepted the Peterbald into championship competition in 2005, athough the breed remains very rare.